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Saturday, 28 June 2014

National Insect Week 23rd - 29th June 2014








1961 Light Emerald Campaea margaritata

1961 Light Emerald Moth - Campaea margaritata


light-emerald-moth

Wingspan 30-40 mm.

Description

An attractive pale-green species, which has a blood-red tip to the forewing, sometimes extending as a line along the outer edge of both fore and hindwings.

It is quite commonly distributed throughout most of the British Isles, and flies from June to August, often with a partial second generation in the south, appearing in August and September.

The larvae live on the foliage of a number of deciduous trees, and have a distinctive fringe of 'hairs' all along the underside

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Friday, 27 June 2014

Deraeocoris flavilinea - A Mirid Bug

Deraeocoris flavilinea - A Mirid Bug

Deraeocoris flavilinea 29381


Deraeocoris flavilinea 29369


Deraeocoris flavilinea 29392

Further to The Species Nymph

Deraeocoris flavilinea Family Miridae

Adult: June-July

Length 7-8 mm

Description

A new coloniser entering circa 1996, and is now widely established and common across south and central Britain at least.Host-plants are sycamore and field maple, although it may frequently be encountered on other trees and shrubs.

D. flavilinea is a large and fairly distinctive bug, but sexually dimorphic and thus rather variable. Males are much darker than the more orange females, and the front and rear margins of the pronotum are narrowly pale. The cuneus is variable and the sides of the scutellum paler in both sexes.

The tibial banding pattern is shared by D. olivaceus, which is brick red in colour, similar to female flavilinea. However, this uncommon species is larger, has long hairs on the sides of the pronotum and is associated with hawthorn.

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Thursday, 26 June 2014

1497 Amblyptilia acanthadactyla Beautiful Plume

1497 Amblyptilia acanthadactyla


Brown Plume Moth 30074 



Brown Plume Moth 30071




Brown Plume Moth 30063

Wingspan 17-23 mm.

Description  Well distributed over much of Britain and Ireland, and, since the 1990s, has become much more frequent, including in gardens.

Like its relative, A. punctidactyla, the hindwing has two patches of black scales on its dorsum, which protrude when the rest of the hindwing is covered by the forewing. Amblyptilia acanthadactyla may be distinguished by its warm reddish brown colour from the greyish brown of A. punctidactyla.

Life Cycle  There are two generations, with moths on the wing in July and again from September onwards, flying after hibernation until May. The adults are attracted to light.

The larvae feed in June and in August on the flowers and young leaves of a large range of plants, including restharrow (Ononisspp.), Hedge woundwort (Stachys sylvatica), cranesbills and cultivated geraniums (Geranium spp.), goosefoots (Chenopodiumspp.), heathers (Calluna and Erica spp.), and mints (Menthaspp.) On the continent, it has also been reported on Salvia, Teucrium scorodonia, Lavandula, Euphrasia, Carlina, Vaccinium, Calamintha and Nepeta. Several other plume species feed on some of these plants, so caution should be exercised when identifying the larvae.


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Tuesday, 24 June 2014

Cantharis pellucida Soldier Beetle

Cantharis pellucida  Soldier Beetle

Cantharis pellucida 29869

Description

This common 'soldier beetle' has a red thorax and legs with black or grey elytra The black 'mask' on its head gives it a rather goggle-eyed look.

Habitat

Hedgerows and meadows. They are frequently found on open flowers such as Hawthorn and umbellifers where they feed on both nectar and pollen as well as predating other small insects.

Life History

The larvae are like velvety caterpillars and they feed on the ground, hunting snails and other small creatures.

Phenology

Early May to July
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Click Beetle - Athous haemorrhoidalis

Click Beetle - Athous haemorrhoidalis

Athous haemorrhoidalis 30003


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Xylota segnis - A hoverfly


Xylota segnis - A hoverfly


Xylota segnis 29951

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Monday, 23 June 2014

2462 Mother Shipton Callistege mi

2462 Mother Shipton Callistege mi


Mother Shipton 30042


Wingspan 25-30 mm.


Description A day-flying moth, preferring sunshine and taking short, rapid flights. The English name refers to the forewing markings, which appear to show an old lady or witch's head.

Habitat  Inhabiting waste ground, downland and other open habitats, it is reasonably common over much of the British Isles, becoming scarcer in Scotland and Ireland.

Flight Period It flies in May and June, and the larvae feed mainly on clover (Trifolium) and various grasses.


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Saturday, 21 June 2014

2069 The Cinnabar Tyria jacobaeae

2069 The Cinnabar Tyria jacobaeae

Cinabar 29925

2069 The Cinnabar Tyria jacobaeae

Wingspan 32-42 mm.

Distribution

Resembling no other British species, except perhaps the burnets (Zygaenidae), this is a fairly common moth in much of Britain.

It is generally nocturnal, but is quite often disturbed during the day from long grass, low herbage etc. At night, it comes to light.

The distinctive larvae, with their yellow and black hoops, generally feed gregariously on ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) and other related plants.


Flight Period is May through July


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Friday, 20 June 2014

0004 Micropterix aruncella White Barred Gold

0004 Micropterix aruncella White Barred Gold


Micropterix aruncella 29973

Wingspan 6-8 mm.

Description

The members of the genus Micropterix are unusual in that the adults have fully functional mouthparts, unlike most other moths, and feed on the pollen of various plants.

This species occurs widely over most of the British Isles, and flies in the daytime between May and August. It is a tiny species with a wingspan of around 6 or 7 mm, and in common with other similar species, has metallic forewings.

The early stages are not well described, but the larvae are believed to feed at the bases of herbaceous plants.


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2299 Mouse Moth Amphipyra tragopoginis


2299 Mouse Moth Amphipyra tragopoginis


Caterpillar 29557

Wingspan

33-38 mm.

Description

A very plain-looking moth, with three dark dots on the forewing, the ground colour is dark brown with a distinct glossy sheen.

The adults are on the wing from July to September and frequently visit sugar as well as light. If disturbed, they will scuttle away mouse-like rather than take flight.

The species is commonly distributed over most of the British Isles, occupying a range of habitats.

The caterpillars feed on a variety of herbaceous plants, including the flowers, as well as trees such as sallow(Salix).


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Thursday, 19 June 2014

1627 Small Heath Butterfly Coenonympha pamphilus

Small Heath Coenonympha pamphilus


Small Heath 29538


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1531 Large Skipper - Ochlodes sylvanus


Large Skipper - Ochlodes sylvanus


Large Skipper 29668

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Male

1629 Ringlet - Aphantopus hyperantus


Ringlet - Aphantopus hyperantus


Ringlet 29722



Ringlet 29618

Ringlet  Aphantopus hyperantus Family Nymphalidae

A common butterfly  unmistakable when seen at rest - the rings on the hindwings giving this butterfly its common name. The uppersides are a uniform chocolate brown that distinguish this butterfly from the closely-related Meadow Brown. Despite this uniformity, a newly-emerged adult is a surprisingly beautiful insect, the velvety wings providing a striking contrast with the delicate white fringes found on the wing edges. The dark colouring also allows this butterfly to quickly warm up - this butterfly being one of the few that flies on overcast days.


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Wednesday, 18 June 2014

1561 Small Copper - Lycaena phlaeas

1561 Small Copper - Lycaena phlaeas


Small Copper 29710



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2474 Straw Dot Rivula sericealis


2474 Straw Dot Rivula sericealis


Straw Dot 29506

Wingspan 18-22 mm.

Description

Relatively common in the southern half of Britain, and becoming gradually scarcer further north, this moth is also a suspected immigrant.

The two generations a year fly in June and July, and again in August and September.

Habitat

Damp meadows and woodland are its favourite haunts, and it flies from dusk into the night when it is attracted to light.

Various grasses form the larval foodplants.


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Saturday, 14 June 2014

Life in The Long Grass - Mirid Nymphs - Deraeocoris flavilinea - Grypocoris stysi

Two Grassland Mirid Nymphs


Deraeocoris flavilinea Nymph 

Nymph 29283

Grypocoris stysi 

Grypocoris stysi 29216


TBC


Nymph 29151





Clay-coloured Weevil - Otiorhynchus singularis



Clay-coloured Weevil - Otiorhynchus singularis



Clay Coloured Weevil 29180

Size  

A clay brown weevil about 8 mm long.

Description 

Adults emerge in early spring. They climb up the plant after dark and feed on developing buds and flower shoots. They shelter in the soil and debris at the base of the plant. Eggs are laid in the soil and soon hatch. The larvae feed on the roots, often at a depth of about 50 cm. When fully mature, they pupate in earthen cells and emerge as adults.

Habitat

These weevils feed on shrubs such as Rhododendrons and Raspberry and can be a pest of Raspberry fruit farmers.



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Friday, 13 June 2014

1728 Garden Carpet Xanthorhoe fluctuata

1728 Garden Carpet Xanthorhoe fluctuata


Garden carpet 29352

1728 Garden Carpet Xanthorhoe fluctuata

Wingspan 18-25 mm.

Descrpition  A common species throughout the British Isles, this moth shows a preference for suburban habitats, but can be found almost anywhere.

It is continuously-brooded during the summer months from April through to September, and adults and larvae could be found in any of these months.

The larvae feed on a range of cruciferous plants


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Wednesday, 11 June 2014

Deraeocoris flavilinea - A Mirid Nymph

 Deraeocoris flavilinea - A Mirid Nymph



Nymph 29277


Family: Miridae

Adult: June-July

Length 7-8 mm

A species which has rapidly colonised the UK following its arrival in 1996, and is now widely established and common across south and central Britain at least. The host-plants are sycamore and field maple, although it may frequently be encountered on other trees and shrubs.

D. flavilinea is a large and fairly distinctive bug, but sexually dimorphic and thus rather variable. Males are much darker than the more orange females, and the front and rear margins of the pronotum are narrowly pale. The cuneus is variable and the sides of the scutellum paler in both sexes.

The tibial banding pattern is shared by D. olivaceus, which is brick red in colour, similar to female flavilinea. However, this uncommon species is larger, has long hairs on the sides of the pronotum and is associated with hawthorn.






Tuesday, 10 June 2014

1742 Yellow Shell Camptogramma bilineata

1742 Yellow Shell Camptogramma bilineata


Yellowshell 29231



Wingspan 20-25 mm.


Description A very variable species, with examples ranging from bright yellow through to dark brown, and also variable in size. Four different subspecies occur, with the smaller and darker ones frequenting rocky places in northern Scotland and Ireland.It is quite common throughout Britain, occupying a range of habitats, but with a preference for damper areas.

It has one generation, flying from June through to August, and the larvae feed on a variety of low-growing plants, including chickweed (Stellaria media) and sorrel (Rumex).


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Cyllecoris histrionius - A Mirid Bug



Cyllecoris histrionius 29301


Cyllecoris histrionius Family Miridae


Adult: May-July

Length 6-8 mm

Elongate bug is common on oak across the UK. The largely black pronotum is strongly narrowed at the front, forming a distinct collar which is marked with yellow or white. 

Overwinters as eggs, which hatch in spring producing pale whitish blue-green larvae.

Adults are found mainly from late May to July.

A Predatory bug, feeding on other small animals such as aphids and bark flies, as well as unopened oak catkins and young acorns. 

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Monday, 9 June 2014

1376 Small Magpie Eurrhypara hortulata

1376 Small Magpie Eurrhypara hortulata


Small Magpie 29129

1376 Small Magpie Eurrhypara hortulata

Wingspan 24-28 mm.

One of the most familiar of the Pyralidae, with its yellowish body parts and black-and-white patterned wings. 

Common in the southern half of Britain, becoming less so further north, and flies in June and July. 

Larva feeds from a rolled or spun leaf in August and September before hibernating in a tough silk cocoon in a hollow stem or under bark. Pupation occurs in May in the same cocoon, without further feeding. 
The main foodplant is nettle (Urtica dioica), but woundworts (Stachys spp.), mints (Mentha spp.), 
horehounds (Marrubium and Ballota), and bindweeds (Convolvulus and Calystegia) are also used.



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Bright Eyes - The Common Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis agg


The Common Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis agg

Eyebright 29016

Flowers:

The tiny flowers of eyebright measure 8-13 mm. in length and possess beautifully intricate coloring and detail. This bilaterally symmetrical bloom has a fused corolla that opens into two lips: a small two-lobed upper lip and a larger lower lip that is divided into three palmately divided, notched lobes. Overall, the bloom is pale lavender or white. Each lobe has three dark-purple veins and the central lobe of the lower lip has a prominent, bright yellow honey spot. Bracts are green and surround the base of each flower.

Fruit:

Eyebright produces a small, capsule-like fruit.

Leaves:

The leaves of this plant are very small, measuring 6-20 mm. in length, slender, coarsely toothed, have brown tips, and are densely arranged along the length of the stem and throughout the flower cluster.

Habitat:

Eyebright grows best around fields and along roadsides.

A small flower of about The genus Euphrasia is taxonomically complicated due to many species being interfertile and prone to hybridisation.A group of small, hemiparasitic annuals on the roots of diverse herbs and small shrubs, mainly found in permanent or semi-permanent grasslands

They are semi-parasitic on grasses and other plants. The common name refers to the plant's use in treating eye infections.

Eyebright has been divided into a large number of microspecies and their hybrids,. The flowers are usually white with a yellow throat borne in a spike. Leaves are opposite and toothed.


Sunday, 8 June 2014

A False Blister Beetle - Oedemera lurida

This False Blister beetle is likely Oedemera lurida which is less specatacular than its close relative withi ts very swollen rear legs Oedemera nobilis

  Oedemera 28961

Oedemera lurida A False Blister Beetle


Length 5 to 8 mm.


Descripton A generally long and slender species, which is a greyish sage green in colour. It often leaves its elytra (wing cases) agape


Active in bright sunshine in open habitats with plenty of wild flowers such as Hawthorn and umbellifers, where they feed on pollen and nectar.


Life History  Larvae develop in dead herbaceous stems.

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Green Lacewing Chrysopa perla


This Green Lacewing is Chrysopa likely perla Dark 2nd Antennal Segment and roundish  spot between the eyes


Lacewing 29011


Length: 10 to 12 mm, Wingspan: 25 to 30 mm.

Description   This is a blue-green lacewing with black wing veins and extensive black markings on its head and thorax. The second antennal segment is black and it also has a black underside to its abdomen.

The other similar species is the supposedly rare Chrysopa dorsalis which is associated with Pine trees. The main distinguishing feature is the pale spot between the eyes - which is roundish in C. perla and more oval in C. dorsalis.


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Saturday, 7 June 2014

Do Lally Wagtail ,Beligerant Jay & Ladybirds !!

A walk along the Calder Hebble Canal to Elland Lock in the Local area of Cromwell Bottom LNR revealed some interesting residents . A Pied Wagtail was seen rapidly dancing up and down one of the lock ledges rapidly picking off the many insects coming off the water Apologies for Picture Quality Pocket Camera Used

Elland Lock


IMG_0047

An Afternoon Jay !!

Jay 0056

A Pied Wagtail Patrolling for Flies

Pied Wagtail 0050


Also in the vicinity where ladybird Larvae which had recently hatched on the underside of aphid rich leaves in the images below you can see they are eating the egg Shell


Ladybird Eggs 0065

Tuesday, 3 June 2014

Liocoris tripustulatus - Mirid Bug - Common On Nettle

Liocoris tripustulatus Miridae 4-5 mm



Liocoris tripustulatus 28538


Liocoris tripustulatus

Family: Miridae

Length 4-5 mm

Common throughout the UK and associated mainly with nettles, the foodplant for all life stages, this is a variable but distinctive species. The colour of the scutellum and cuneus ranges from cream to deep yellow and the pale legs are striped with black rings. Short dark spines are present on the tibiae. Head width ≈ 1/2 pronotum width, length of 2nd antennal segment > head width.
, and variation in colour is strongly related to age. On spring emergence following hibernation, the ground colour is typically darker and the cuneus more orange-yellow. Following mating, females may survive until the new generation of adults appears in mid-summer, which is generally paler and less intensely marked.

CF  Orthops
Adult: All yearThis bug may be found as an adult all year



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